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Thread: Itavia 870 (DC-9-15)

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    Member James Bond's Avatar
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    Default Itavia 870 (DC-9-15)

    AirDisaster.com Forum Member 2004-2008

    Quote Originally Posted by orangehuggy View Post
    the most dangerous part of a flight is not the take off or landing anymore, its when a flight crew member goes to the toilet

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    Junior Member Arrow's Avatar
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    Holy smokes! 30 years+ to get to here? Wow!

    Arrow

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    Member hongmng's Avatar
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    Yes, this accident is really mysterious

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itavia_870

    Some of the Italian Air Force officials who might have known about the disaster's background died suddenly.[8]
    3 August 1980: Col. Pierangelo Teoldi, was nominated to become Commander of Grosseto AFB, but had not yet assumed command at the time of his death - car accident.
    9 May 1981: Maurizio Gari, Poggio Ballone air defense radar controller - heart attack at age 37.
    31 March 1987: Mario Alberto Dettori, Poggio Ballone air defence radar controller - suicide by hanging.
    28 August 1988: Mario Naldini and Ivo Nutarelli, Italian Air Force - the pilots who crossed Flight 870's path on 27 June over Tuscany - mid air collision during the 1988 Ramstein Air Show.
    1 February 1991: Antonio Muzio, Lamezia Terme control tower officer - murdered.
    2 February 1992: Antonio Pagliara, Otranto air defence radar controller - car accident.
    21 December 1995: Franco Parisi, Otranto air defense radar controller - suicide by hanging.

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    Junior Member Arrow's Avatar
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    CTs

    Arrow

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    I've always found this interesting regarding Itavia 870 CVR transcript

    http://aviation-safety.net/investiga.../atc_ih870.php

    F/O 870, good evening, Rome.
    Rome (South Sector) ACC Good evening, 870; mainatin 290, report Amber 13, Alpha.
    F/O Yes...neither Ponza is working ? We've found a graveyard this evening; coming from Firenze we didn't find one beacon working properly.
    Rome ACC In fact, everything is a bit out, Ponza too. What's your heading now ?
    F/O We've 195.
    Rome ACC Well, maintain 195. You'll go some mile south of Ponza.
    Rome ACC I don't know if you want to keep this heading. Otherwise you can go left, 15-20 degrees.
    F/O OK, we put 210.
    Generally speaking, is this unusual?
    AirDisaster.com Forum Member 2004-2008

    Quote Originally Posted by orangehuggy View Post
    the most dangerous part of a flight is not the take off or landing anymore, its when a flight crew member goes to the toilet

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    Member aceriana's Avatar
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    The most probable truth of this story lies in the hands of the US Navy, the French Navy and the Italian Air Force. All know what happened yet they have all closed their doors hiding the truth for over 30 years.

    • The USS Saratoga was said to be in Naples port, official onboard log, yet nobody saw the ship in Naples harbour that night.
    • The French ship Clemenceau was near the island of Sardegna - yet the French have never opened their books.
    • NATO had an E-3 AWACS aircraft flying in the area - but what that plane "saw" has never been revealed.
    • The Italian Air Force had many radars active that night, but somehow the tapes / transcripts were all manipulated.
    I find it really odd that whoever fired the missile that mistakenly hit the Itavia plane, does not come out and spill the beans - after 30 years. Then again that pilot may be dead now, and not for natural causes.
    ___________________________________________



    Alberto

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    Quote Originally Posted by aceriana View Post
    The most probable truth of this story lies in the hands of the US Navy, the French Navy and the Italian Air Force. All know what happened yet they have all closed their doors hiding the truth for over 30 years.

    • The USS Saratoga was said to be in Naples port, official onboard log, yet nobody saw the ship in Naples harbour that night.
    • The French ship Clemenceau was near the island of Sardegna - yet the French have never opened their books.
    • NATO had an E-3 AWACS aircraft flying in the area - but what that plane "saw" has never been revealed.
    • The Italian Air Force had many radars active that night, but somehow the tapes / transcripts were all manipulated.
    I find it really odd that whoever fired the missile that mistakenly hit the Itavia plane, does not come out and spill the beans - after 30 years. Then again that pilot may be dead now, and not for natural causes.
    The canopy of a [allegedly] Mig 23 was found with the Itavia wreck at the bottom of the ocean. (Can anyone ID it as being of a Mig?)



    As seen in this photo (the other bits in the background are those of Itavia 870)
    AirDisaster.com Forum Member 2004-2008

    Quote Originally Posted by orangehuggy View Post
    the most dangerous part of a flight is not the take off or landing anymore, its when a flight crew member goes to the toilet

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    Member aceriana's Avatar
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    Actually, a MIG 23MS was found crashed in the mountains of Calabria two months after the Itavia crash. Calabria is a barren land with many highly unaccessible areas. The MIG crashed about 200-250 KM from where the Itavia crashed.

    One of the many stories surrounding the Itavia crash (and the most plausible given the few facts...) is that on the evening of June 27, 1980 a plane carrying Col. Gaddafi was flying over the Mediterranean Sea escorted by a MIG (or various MIGs) on his way to Warsaw. Gaddafi's plane turned back after being warned by the Italian secret service, that NATO was staging a trap to shoot him down. Apparently some military pilot got a little too excited and fired one or more missiles, hitting the Itavia plane - by mistake.

    Perhaps the cockpit is that of the MIG 23 crashed in Calabria.
    ___________________________________________



    Alberto

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    There are many other mysterious things:
    for example, Ramstein accident could be not so "accidental":
    http://www.libreidee.org/en/2012/02/...ero-su-ustica/
    although it seems unlikely.

    but foremost, in my opinion, there is the demonstration of a palestinian bomb on board:
    https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...UJSHpg3GpYkAZQ

    some governments (italian "commies") had the interest to accuse the U.S.

    (original PDF:http://www.stragi80.it/documenti/ric...ni/taylor1.PDF).

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    Quote Originally Posted by aceriana View Post
    Actually, a MIG 23MS was found crashed in the mountains of Calabria two months after the Itavia crash. Calabria is a barren land with many highly unaccessible areas. The MIG crashed about 200-250 KM from where the Itavia crashed.

    One of the many stories surrounding the Itavia crash (and the most plausible given the few facts...) is that on the evening of June 27, 1980 a plane carrying Col. Gaddafi was flying over the Mediterranean Sea escorted by a MIG (or various MIGs) on his way to Warsaw. Gaddafi's plane turned back after being warned by the Italian secret service, that NATO was staging a trap to shoot him down. Apparently some military pilot got a little too excited and fired one or more missiles, hitting the Itavia plane - by mistake.

    Perhaps the cockpit is that of the MIG 23 crashed in Calabria.
    I'm aware of the MIG found in Castelsilano. My understanding is that this canopy and the Calabria MIG are entirely different. (but I could be wrong)

    So in theory (assuming I'm wrong) this canopy was found with the DC9 wreck at 38 50′ 22.18″ N, 13 25′ 31.06″ E while the Calabria MIG was found at 39 16' 30.00" N, 16 48' 0.00" E, a distance of 295.4 km. Seems unlikely?

    So maybe it is the canopy of the MIG found in Castelsilano but why did they put it with the Itavia wreck? It's all very confusing.

    I also found this great article in the Corriere della Sera archives from 1996. They interview a CIA officer who examined the MIG crashed in Calabria.

    http://archiviostorico.corriere.it/1...60718043.shtml

    I'm going to email the journalist who runs stragi80.it and see if he can shed some light on the canopy.

    Another photo of the canopy, from a different angle

    AirDisaster.com Forum Member 2004-2008

    Quote Originally Posted by orangehuggy View Post
    the most dangerous part of a flight is not the take off or landing anymore, its when a flight crew member goes to the toilet

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